Las Vegas Events

Las Rageous 2018 - Friday

Friday

Apr 20, 2018 – All Day

200 South 3rd Street
Las Vegas, NV 89101 Map

  • New Years Day
  • OTHERWISE (Rock)
  • Pop Evil
  • UNDEROATH
  • Beartooth
  • A Perfect Circle
  • GHOST
  • Clutch

More Info

New Years Day: THE STORY SO FAR: For a band who've been together just 10 months, New Years Day have quite a list of accomplishments—most notably, piquing the interest of a certain Fall Out Boy's record label. "We were approached by Decaydance about putting something out in the future," explains guitarist/keyboardist Keith Drover, "but as luck would have it, we lagged and lost our chance to be a part of it." Decaydance's loss is surely another label's gain, and with New Years Day's blend of girl-power vocals and dark pop-song structures, we'd advise A&R reps to start booking flights, like, now.

WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW 'EM: When Motion City Soundtrack's Justin Pierre offers you a song, you sing it. "He's an extremely talented musician with an incredible ear," gushes singer Ashley Hittesdorf of the Pierre-written, NYD-performed "About A Boy." "We're hoping to collaborate [again] on our first full-length." When will that be? Well, the band are hoping to hook up with engineer Steve Evetts when he's done working on the new Saves The Day album. "It's easy to do what you love, but it's not as easy to be able to afford to do it," explains Drover. "It's a tough line to walk, but we know we have to pay our dues to make this all successful." —Leslie Simon

OTHERWISE (Rock): In the City of Sin, the five-headed monster known as OTHERWISE is born. Soaring melodies, lethal guitars and bone-shattering drums collide to awaken this beautiful beast. The poet-warriors of OTHERWISE sharpen their musical talons, lying in wait to be unleashed upon an unsuspecting populace, to cast their shadow across the land with unfurled wings of fortune and glory. With a little luck, OTHERWISE sit poised to conquer the world, three and a half minutes at a time...

UNDEROATH: With eight years having passed since we last heard new music from Underøath, that near decade-length absence weighed heavily upon music lovers’ hearts. When you consider all of the bands that formed using their idiosyncratic power and texture as blueprints (and then hearing those pretenders fail anyway), you can clearly see the hole Underøath left behind. Whatever real-life worries, psychic baggage or other concerns plagued Spencer Chamberlain, Aaron Gillespie, Tim McTague, Chris Dudley, Grant Brandell and James Smith at the time of their 2013 farewell tour, Underøath’s collective consciousness has been fortified by a renewed commitment to their art. And more importantly, themselves.

“We had been doing this for 13 or so years,” says Chamberlain, the band’s dynamic frontman, about the respite that got them to where they are now. “We were just done by that point. We never knew how long it was going to last. How many hardcore bands last? It’s not like we hated each other, the music or the industry. We blinked, and a decade went by of never being home. But we needed that break, otherwise now wouldn’t have been possible.”

“We got about two weeks into the Rebirth tour,” remembers drummer/vocalist Gillespie, “and thought, ‘Waaaaait a second. This is too important. It’s too important to our fans and it’s too important to us and the feelings we have playing together are too important to ignore.’ And then we slowly asked the question: What’s next? Then we did Rebirth all over the world. Then we toured with Bring Me The Horizon. Then we did festivals. All along, there was this nagging thought: Are we going to make a record? It was a weird question to impose upon ourselves.”

Never was an imposition more on point: On their Fearless Records debut Erase Me, Underøath have added another crucial chapter to their formidable legacy. When the band went in the studio in the summer of 2017 to record their sixth album with producer Matt Squire (Panic! At The Disco, 3OH!3), they knew exactly what they wanted to do as well as what they needed to do. Having already established themselves both as melodic songwriters (2004’s RIAA-Certified Gold record They’re Only Chasing Safety) and as ambitious power merchants (2006’s stentorian, gold-selling Define The Great Line and its majestic follow-up, 2008’s Lost In The Sound Of Separation), the evolution detailed on Erase Me finds them using the sonic dialects they’ve crafted to reveal where they are now.

Assisted by Squire’s sonic psychology and enhanced with a wildly vivid mix from Ken Andrews (co-founder of acclaimed LA outfit Failure), Erase Me never equates getting older with being complacent. Right out of the gate, “It Has To Start Somewhere” burns like a rail dragster achieving top speed before hurling itself straight into the sun. “Wake Me” is almost pop that overshadows whatever manufactured nine-person co-writing session is currently being marketed on streaming-service playlists. “Rapture” feels like prog rock that traverses generations near and far, while Dudley’s electronics drive “No Frame” into universes unknown. Even the first single, “On My Teeth,” seemingly sends a warning to listeners to protect their necks. Underøath may have tempered the punishing riffage of their previous releases, but they doubled-down on the urgency, via every scream out of Chamberlain’s face, guitarist McTague’s sense of the appropriate and Gillespie’s frenetic thrashing of his kit. When considering the pretenders that came to fill the void during their absence, Erase Me inarguably proves that Underøath’s only true competition is themselves.

“The only rule we had on this record was to reject the phrase we said about our previous records,” says Chamberlain. “’That’s not Underoath enough.’ We left that shit in St. Petersburg when we played that last farewell show. To say something’s ‘not Underoath enough’ robs us of growing. We didn’t say we were going to make an artsy record, a melodic record or a record our fans will like. We made a record that stokes us out that we love. And in my whole life, I’ve never said that on any record I’ve ever been on. That’s us growing up and progressing—not just as musicians but as human beings.””

Clearly, Erase Me is the apex where melodic heft, indefatigable power, spatial resonance and arcane electronic textures converge to reveal a band that’s positively fearless. But like Chamberlain says, Underøath’s creative and personal growth manifests itself in more ways than the stuff coming out of the speakers. For the singer, it meant him coming to terms with his struggles with chemical dependency and his quest to rise above it. In addition, the band who once openly--and without apology--professed their faith-based worldview onstage nightly, have since moved beyond the realm of seemingly impenetrable polemics. At various junctures, Erase Me illustrates those moments of sanctuary, anxiety, betrayal and conflict that inevitably arise when humanity grapples with belief systems. Underøath are not being provocative to create shock value, faux-hipster smugness or revisionist history toward their accomplishments. This is where their reality has taken them: That such a narrative exists in the first place is a true manifestation of their personal growth.

With all the accolades, the history, the fandom, as well as the hardships and growing pains in their psychic rearview mirror, Underøath are just as committed to their legacy as much as their friendships. Erase Me is a bold step for a band who want to preserve their integrity in a world where cashing in is a false equivalence for actively delivering mediocre art. When asked if he feels his band still has something to prove this far in, Gillespie is lucid.

“We’ve had success and we’ve come through a lot of waters,” he offers plaintively. “There’s been 11,000 things we’ve been through. So, you would think, almost rhetorically, ‘What do you need now?’ All of us are finally in that place in our lives where the only thing we care about is inclusion for everybody—for the world. For me, exclusion is the scariest thing in the world. And I think as Underøath are coming back now with a new record—which none of us thought was possible—we want people to know that this is your music and you can feel however the fuck you want about it. I just want to prove that we are doing everything in the most honest way we ever have. This is the healthiest we’ve ever been as a group of people, as musicians, and in our worldview.”

Don’t kid yourself: Even with a comeback title seemingly marinating in self-fulfilling prophecy, nobody in their right mind would dare delete Underøath’s measurable contribution to the advancement of post-hardcore and heavy rock. The only thing you need to erase is your patience with their pretenders. Accept no substitutes and your culture won’t feel destitute. It’s great to have Underøath back—especially on their terms.

A Perfect Circle: While A Perfect Circle might have started as a side project for Maynard James Keenan while on hiatus from Tool, the supergroup and its tour dates have become just as popular as its predecessor. A Perfect Circle currently features Keenan, Smashing Pumpkins guitarist James Iha, Vandals drummer Josh Freese, the band's founder and lead guitarist Billy Howerdel, and Puscifier bassist Matt McJunkins. Their unique brand of heavy alt-rock and metal has thrilled grateful fans by filling a gap that has been left by the popularity of hardcore and metalcore. Howerdel recently announced that the band is working on new music (the first since their 2004 hiatus), and that some of the songs might appear on tour dates in 2011. With a possible album and concert schedule in the near future, it's a good time to be a fan of A Perfect Circle.

The formation of A Perfect Circle began like every amateur musician's fantasy for Billy Howerdel. Howerdel was a well known guitar tech for bands like Fishbone, The Smashing Pumpkins, and Tool. He and Keenan became friends on tour dates in 1992 and, in 1995, Howerdel played a few of his original songs for Keenan. Keenan enjoyed the music and agreed to sing for Howerdel should he ever put a band together. And put a band together he did, with Pez Lenchantin on bass, Troy Van Leeuwen on guitar, and Tim Alexander on drums, with Alexander soon being replaced by Freese. After playing gigs around Los Angeles, A Perfect Circle released their debut album, Mer de Noms, in 2000. The album debuted at #4 on the Billboard 200 and went platinum in just six months, a feat that was extremely rare for a new rock band. The album produced the three singles "Judith," "3 Libras," and "The Hollow," and critics praised the combination of Keenan's voice and Howerdel's lyrics.

The band's second album, Thirteenth Step, wasn't released until 2003, but was praised as a positive evolution of A Perfect Circle's sound. The album debuted at #2 on the charts and featured a softer, more melodic sound; despite the change, fans responded positively. A Perfect Circle's third album, Emotive, was released in 2004, to coincide with the US election day. The album featured ten covers of war protest songs, along with original tracks like "Passive." While the album performed well, it marked a hiatus for A Perfect Circle as the musicians took time to work on their previous or independent projects.

In 2010, the new lineup of A Perfect Circle announced a new concert schedule where they would be playing three shows in each town, with each show consisting of one of the group's albums. A Perfect Circle have tour dates in 2011 set for Rock on the Range Festival in Ohio, Boonstock Music Festival in Alberta, and Edgefest in Toronto. In addition to festival appearances, A Perfect Circle has announced North American tour dates beginning on June 29 in Portland, Oregon. There are 23 tour dates scheduled in 2011, with the tour covering most major American cities. The concert schedule will end on August 9 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and tickets are already on sale. With A Perfect Circle's many side-projects and commitments, fans should take this opportunity to check out what could be band's final concert schedule.


Clutch: So, you think you know Clutch, right? They’re a little punk? Well, yes, but there again…they’ve a hint of metal? True. However, don’t they also have a touch of the stoner about them? Sure. And while we’re at it, let’s not forget the southern rock influence. Come on, you know what that means. Clutch are genuine individuals, icons for musical excellence who confound the modern desire for putting everything into neat boxes. They’re a classic rock band with an ultra modern sweep.

In the virtual two decades, since they first came to everyone’s attention, the Maryland marvels have constantly evolved and revised their music, never standing still long enough for anyone to put a critical saddle onto their thoroughbred ideals – this bronco ain’t ever been broken in, nor broken down.

From the ‘Pitchfork’ EP in 1991, Clutch have set standards, never followed trends. They’ve released a succession of urgently inspirational albums, from 1993’s ‘Transnational Speedway League: Anthems, Anecdotes And Undeniable Truths’ through ’95’s ‘Clutch’, onwards to ‘The Elephant Riders’ (1998), ‘Pure Rock Fury’ (2001), ‘Blast Tyrant’ (2004) and ’05’s ‘Robot Hive/Exodus’. But their moment has truly arrived with new album ‘From Beale Street To Oblivion’ – a record that won’t so much fit into a new era in rock, as confidently define it.

“This is probably the most ‘live’ album we have recorded,” enthuses vocalist Neil Fallon. “We went out for a few weeks, and played the music on the road. So, when we went into the studio, all f us knew exactly what was going to happen - a first for Clutch. I don’t know why we haven’t done it this way all along, it’s so much easier.

”We also recorded the basic tracks directly onto tape. Nothing digital in there at all. We haven’t done that since ‘The Elephant Riders’. And this record has a few more bluesy elements than has been the case in the past, but nothing so blatant that it could be called alien to what we do.”

Together, Fallon, guitarist Tim Sult, bassist Dan Maines, drummer Jean-Paul Gaster and organist Mick Schauer have created a masterpiece, one that certainly hugs the band’s illustrious past, but takes it even further. It has a retro warmth, wrapped up in a contemporary blaze.

“This time we chose Joe Barresi to produce the album,” continues Fallon. “Why him? Because he has produced some great sounding records in the past, for bands like Kyuss, Tool, Melvins, Queens Of The Stone Age, to name but a few. We were based at Sound City Studios in Los Angeles. It took three weeks to record, and one week to mix. Joe actually mixed ‘From Beale Street To Oblivion’ without us being there, as we had to bail to support Motorhead in the UK and Europe. That’s an indication of how much faith we had in the guy.”

It’s a faith that’s been remarkably well rewarded. Here’s an album that floods the room with riffs, melodies, vitality - and grooves.

“Musically, we’ve become much more of a rock ’n’ roll band now, as opposed to being a metal or hardcore one,” reveals Fallon of the way Clutch have developed. “Our style is riff oriented, with a swing. It’s never been a calculated move; we just followed our instinct, and that is leading us closer to those bands to whom we listened in our childhood. Bands which are now termed as ‘classic rock’.”

When you listen to this album, those names will be obvious. Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Faith No More, Kyuss, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Blue Cheer, Motorhead...all are referenced, but never emulated. This is heritage music re-distributed by a 21st Century attitude. Further proof of a continual growth, as this band plot its course by the stars, not by every passing light.

Clutch now deservedly belongs among the elite. And they’ve got a crucial sense of humour. Be honest, great rock music should make you smile – that is mandatory. It also helps that there’s been a business stability around these five guys for some while, as Fallon explains:

“This is our third album for DRT Entertainment (following on from ‘Blast Tyrant’ and ‘Robot Hive/Exodus’). We’ve never previously done more than two records in a row for any other label, so this is a new territory for us! A lot of that is because this is a smaller company, and they understand what the band is about.”

While their past is impressive enough, the present and future for Clutch suddenly looks even brighter.

“Where do we fit into today’s scene?” laughs Fallon. “I really couldn’t tell you!” With this new album, it’s more a case of where everyone else fits in with Clutch. ‘From Beale Street To Oblivion’ is gonna take them to greater heights than ever before. Welcome aboard – enjoy the trip. The wheel is about to be re-invented.

-Malcolm Dome

Read More

Bring These Similar Artists To Your City

Demand it! ®

and Never Miss a Show Again!

Powered by Eventful, a CBS Local Digital Media Business

More From CBS Las Vegas

CBSLocal App
Watch Live
Eat.See.Play

Listen Live